Would you have to take your daughter out of school if she couldn’t see the board?

I had a email from one of the principals we work with in rural Fiji this morning. It went like this:

One request. We have a girl in F3 (year 9 AU), Pritika, who comes from a very poor family. She did not come to school in the last two weeks of Term 2 or this term for the first 2 weeks. Her mother came with her yesterday and told me that Pritika will not be coming school anymore. Upon enquring I found out that she had broken her eyeglass and she said she cannot see the board and that is why she do not want to attend school. I have talked to the mum and child and managed to convince them to come back to school and said we would try and arrange for some assistance. My humble request is if your organisation can come to the rescue of this child and assist her in having her eyeglass done and if possible with her footwear. I would like to see this child not leaving the school and completing her entire secondary school education.

We have seen time and time again, the desperation of parents who feel that it’s easier to take their daughters out of school to try and work, than overcome obstacles like this that seem insurmountable. Of course I did not hesitate to reply with a resounding yes we will support her fees and current needs and knowing Urmila, our co-ordinator, Pritika will already be sorted out with new glasses and shoes and a box of groceries to help her family out in the short term. Glasses and shoes may have amounted to $50AU at most.

I am very excited to report that we have exceeded our fundraising target for the Blackmore’s Bridge run this weekend! Thank you so much for your generosity, this money will be spent helping girls like Pritika stay at school.

Warmly,

Jane and the a Girl & her world team

Related Posts

Climate Change in Fiji

How climate change affects girls’ education in Fiji

Written by Zeerak Ayaz  Pacific nations are at the front line of the most extreme impacts of unprecedented weather changes.   Fiji in particular is highly susceptible to the dangers of climate change and disaster impacts, particularly cyclones, storm surge flooding

Why boys should care about Girls’ education

*Our high school intern wrote this post from his perspective as a 15 year old boy. * For a long time, women and girls have been treated differently to men and boys. Considered inferior to males in many ways, their

We are celebrating!

This month we are focusing on our 10-year anniversary fundraising event! Your donations and support go such a long way and make a real difference in helping more Girls stay in school. If you, or any of your contacts, would

Celebrating our 10 year anniversary!

Over the past 10 years, we have partnered with hundreds of families to ensure Girls have access to education. We have overcome so many barriers – big and small! From cyclones to Covid, we have partnered with families and supported